Thursday, October 18, 2018

KB4462928 - Critical Update for WS2016 Storage Spaces Direct Deployments


The 10C update for Windows Server 2016 has just been published, it includes critical updates for Storage Spaces Direct deployments and we recommend all customers aggressively adopt.  This update addresses all top known supportability issues.

 

October 18, 2018—KB4462928 (OS Build 14393.2580)


 

 

Important Updates


Specifically, this update includes fixes for the following issues:

 

"Event 5120" with STATUS_IO_TIMEOUT c00000b5 after an S2D node restart on Windows Server 2016 May 2018 update or later


 

Virtual Disks resources are in No Redundancy or Detached status in a Storage Spaces Direct cluster

2018 NY Metro Joint Cyber Security WEBINAR


The 2018 NY Metro Joint Cyber Security WEBINAR will take place on Thursday October 18th. NYMJCSC is now in its fifth year; featuring keynotes, panels and sessions aimed at various aspects of information security and technology.

This year will feature a webinar format allowing NYMJCSC to reach and educate a broader audience.

To register please go here
Conference Agenda
Time
Slot
Topic Speaker
2:00
- 2:40
Behavior-based Internal Controls that Prevent Ransomware, Employee Theft, and Denial of Service attacks
Jeffrey Wagar
Past President,
ISACA New Orleans Chapter
2:45
- 3:25
Cyber Risk: It's All About People
Alan Brill
CISSP, CFE, CIPP/US, FAAFS
Senior Managing Director,
Cyber Risk, North America,
Kroll (a division of Duff & Phelps)
3:30
- 4:10
Cyber Dogfighting: Hacker Decision-Making and the Korean Air War
Mathew J. Heath Van Horn
Assistant Professor,
SUNY Delhi School of Business
4:15
- 4:55
Assessing Legal and Contractual Risk and Uncertainty with Bug Bounty Programs, Vulnerability Disclosures and Information Sharing
Mark H. Francis
Partner - Tech & Data,
Holland & Knight
4:50
- 5:30
"Not If but When?" - Leveraging AI to Jettison Mantras of the Past: How AI will Liberate Security of the Future
John McClurg
VP & Ambassador-At-Large,
Cylance
 

Free NYC Secure app

This new app from NYC
  • Alerts you to unsecure Wi-Fi networks, unsafe apps in Android, system tampering & mor
  • Helps you protect your phone and your privacy
  • $0 to download, $0 to use, no in-app purchases, no ads

How does the app help protect me?

The app detects potential threats in real time to your device, to Wi-Fi networks you may connect to, and for Android users, it detects whether any app you’ve downloaded might 
be unsafe. When the app detects a threat, it will send you an alert in real time and offer a recommendation on how to address the threat, such as suggesting you disconnect from a particular Wi-Fi network. These alerts include:
  • Device alerts—These alerts warn you about settings or activity that could potentially put your device at risk.
  • Network alerts—These alerts warn you about potentially compromised networks you are connected to
  • .App alerts (Android only)—These alerts warn you when issues arise on apps you have installed that could compromise your device's security.
Go here to learn more https://secure.nyc/

Free Credit Protection Information


f you haven’t frozen your credit reports yet, this could be your moment.

Under the Economic Growth, Regulatory Relief, and Consumer Protection Act, freezing your credit at all three major credit bureaus — Equifax(1-800-525-6285), Experian (1-800-397-3742)  and TransUnion ( 1-800-680-7289). Now is for free, previously, states set prices for credit freezes, which typically cost about $10.

Other links of importance


        Federal Trade Commission www.ftc.gov

        Identity Theft Hotline 1-877-438-4338

        Social Security 1-800-269-0271

        In the United States, you can report tech support scams with the Internet Crime Complaint Center (IC3) or use the FTC Complaint Assistant form.
Another tool you might want to look at is  Lock & Alert 


Equifax offers a Lock & Alert service allows you to lock and unlock your Equifax credit report for free, online or with the Equifax Lock & Alert app. By locking your credit report, you can restrict access to it by third parties, with certain exceptions. These exceptions, for instance, may include lenders and creditors where you have existing accounts. Federal, state and local government agencies are also exceptions.
Locking your Equifax credit file will prevent access to it by certain third parties. Locking your Equifax credit file will not prevent access to your credit file at any other credit reporting agency. Entities that may still have access to your Equifax credit file include: companies like Equifax Global Consumer Solutions which provide you with access to your credit report or credit score, or monitor your credit file; federal, state, and local government agencies; companies reviewing your application for employment; companies that have a current account or relationship with you, and collection agencies acting on behalf of those whom you owe; for fraud detection purposes; and companies that wish to make pre-approved offers of credit or insurance to you. To opt out of such pre-approved offers, visit www.optoutprescreen.com.

Draft of NIST’s Transport Layer Security (TLS) Guidance Now Available for Comment:(SP) 800-52 Rev. 2


NIST has released a second draft of NIST Special Publication (SP) 800-52 Revision 2,Guidelines for the Selection, Configuration, and Use of Transport Layer Security (TLS) Implementations. It provides guidance for selecting and configuring TLS protocol implementations that utilize NIST-recommended cryptographic algorithms and Federal Information Processing Standards (FIPS). The document requires that government TLS servers and clients support TLS 1.2 configured with FIPS-based cipher suites, and recommends that agencies develop migration plans to support TLS 1.3 by January 1, 2024.

 

A public comment period for this document is open until November 16, 2018.

 

CSRC Update:


Publication Details:


 

Disaster Relief: Don't be a victim of fraud

As a public Service announcement I am copy and posting this on my blog. The original content comes form CENTER FOR CYBER SAFETY AND EDUCATION,

We have all seen the devastation and trail of destruction that events such as hurricanes, tornadoes, and earthquakes can cause. But before you take out your credit card, make sure your donations are really going to the victims and those that are helping provide them with the materials to survive and start their lives over again. While our hearts ache with helplessness, others’ fill with greed and see this as the perfect opportunity to exploit your sympathies and deceive you into sending money.
If you want to help by donating, make sure you know who you are really donating to before you give out your credit card number or write a check.

Any time you give to a charity, you want to do your homework, but in a crisis like this, we are often inspired by social media or by what we see on television and rush to make a donation. It is in times like these that we recommend you stick with the bigger, established organizations with proven track records. These organizations have the resources and structures to maximize your donation with minimal overhead, meaning more of your money will go to help victims.  You can find a great list of them at https://www.nvoad.org/voad-members/national-members/. Some unknown “charities”, GoFundMe-style requests, and social media outreaches you come across may be legitimate, but many are not. Even if they are really trying to help, it is not uncommon for organizations like these to have high overhead and administrative cost that will result in only a small amount of your donation actually making its way to help the victims.

TIPS WHEN GIVING DURING A CRISIS:
  • Don’t give over the phone or click on links found in emails or social media. Go directly to the official website for a charity that you are familiar with and donate on their page. Don’t give to any third party solicitations.
  • Be skeptical of cash requests in front of your local grocery store or other establishments. Who are these people? Don’t be fooled by what they say or how they are dressed. Ask questions, or better yet, go back home, research them and then donate online.
  • Don’t be fooled by celebrity names being attached to a campaign. The organization could be using someone’s name without their permission, or that celebrity could also have been duped and is unwittingly lending their name to what they think is a good cause.
  • Don’t fall for all the sad stories you are going to see and read about where they ask you to give to help a specific victim. There will be hundreds of thousands of such stories. You can best help by supporting legitimate charities, not by sending them money directly.
  • Give directly to your charity of choice and designate that you want the money to go to their Hurricane Michael Relief efforts. This will restrict them from using the money to fund their other ongoing programs.
Now is not the time to take a chance or fall for a phone or email scam. People really do need help, and it is best to support the experts who are trained and prepared to help those in need.
Your help and support of others is greatly appreciated. Just make sure you don’t get scammed and become a victim yourself.

Friday, October 5, 2018

GhostDNS: 100,00 Infected Routers

Several research labs have been releasing their finding on a new take of DNSChanger.  A new router-based exploit known as GhostDNS seems to be made up of three variations of DNSChanger.  By using Shell DNSChanger, Js DNSChanger, and PyPhp DNSChanger, GhostDNS can infect over 70 different router models. However, GhostDNS is more than the sum of its DNSChanger components. Analysts have also identified that it also is made up of a web admin module, a RougeDNS module, and a phishing module. 

GhostDNS scans the internet looking for routers that it can exploit due to vulnerability or weak security by using its scripts to attack poorly secured Web Administration consoles via Shell, Java, Python, PHP to deploy its payload. The primary purpose is to change the devices’ DNS setting to forward traffic to RougeDNS servers. Once this is done the unsuspecting user is redirected to the phishing landing pages of online services when they attempt to go to various web services. Banking portals, Telecom’s, ISP’s and Netflix seem to be among the most common phishing targets of this malware.   

While there has been some disagreement about the time frame this campaign has been running, it is widely agreed the campaign has infected over 100,000 routers with 86% located in Brazil. The other 24% have been reported across other South American countries. The DNS redirection service know as Rouge has been detected on many notable cloud services like Amazon, OVH, Google, Telefonica, and Oracle but researchers have been in contact with larger networks and ISP’s to shut down the network. 

The GhostDNS payload can deliver over 100 scripts via remote access or utilizing exploits, and can attack hardware from older HP (3Com), A-Link, Alcatel / Techicolor, Antena, C3-Tech, Cisco, D-Link, Elsys, Fibrehome, Fiberlink, Geneko, Greatek, Huawei, Intelbras, Kaiomy, LinkOne, MikroTik, MPI Networks, Multilaser, OIWTECH, Perfect, Qtech, Ralink, Roteador, Sapido, Secutech, Siemens, Technic, Tenda, Thomson, TP-Link, Ubiquiti, Viking, ZTE, and Zyxel routers. 
Analysts have some advice to not become a victim this kind of attack. It is recommended that you update your firmware to the latest version available for your router and use complex and strong passwords. Consider disabling any web administration on your device. Finally, hardcode your DNS setting to use only trusted DNS servers in both your Router and OS. 

Sources
https://thehackernews.com/2018/10/ghostdns-botnet-routerhacking.html https://www.theregister.co.uk/2018/10/02/ghostdns_router_hacking/ 
http://blog.netlab.360.com/70-different-types-of-home-routers-alltogether-100000-are-being-hijacked-by-ghostdns-en/ h

Thursday, October 4, 2018

Supply Chain Issue

The Big Hack: How China Used a Tiny Chip to Infiltrate U.S. Companies

 
here a great article on Supply chain  on the Bloomberg site. The article is here

Wednesday, October 3, 2018

Facebook Breach



10/03/2018 01:30 PM EDT

 

Original release date: October 03, 2018

The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) has released an alert to provide Facebook users with recommended precautions against identity theft after the recent breach of the Facebook social media platform.

NCCIC encourages users and administrators to review the FTC Alert and the NCCIC Tip on Preventing and Responding to Identity Theft. If you believe you are a victim of identity theft, visit the FTC’s identity theft website to make a report.

Tuesday, October 2, 2018

2018 NY Metro Joint Cyber Security WEBINAR

October 18th WEBINAR

The 2018 NY Metro Joint Cyber Security WEBINAR will take place on Thursday October 18th. NYMJCSC is now in its fifth year; featuring keynotes, panels and sessions aimed at various aspects of information security and technology.

This year will feature a webinar format allowing NYMJCSC to reach and educate a broader audience.


Time Slot Topic Speaker
2:00 - 2:40 Behavior-based Internal Controls that Prevent Ransomware, Employee Theft, and Denial of Service attacks Jeffrey Wagar
2:45 - 3:25 Cyber Risk: It's All About People Alan Brill
3:30 - 4:10 Cyber Dogfighting: Hacker Decision-Making and the Korean Air War Mathew J. Heath Van Horn
4:15 - 4:55 Assessing Legal and Contractual Risk and Uncertainty with Bug Bounty Programs, Vulnerability Disclosures and Information Sharing Mark H. Francis
4:50 - 5:30 "Not If but When?" - Leveraging AI to Jettison Mantras of the Past: How AI will Liberate Security of the Future John McClurg




Register Here for the Webinar on Thursday, October 18th

Security baseline (DRAFT) for Windows 10 v1809 and Windows Server 2019

icrosoft is pleased to announce the draft release of the security configuration baseline settings for Windows 10 version 1809 (a.k.a., “Redstone 5” or “RS5”), and for Windows Server 2019. Please evaluate these proposed baselines and send us your feedback via blog comments below.

Download the content here: Windows-10-1809-Security-Baseline-DRAFT.zip

The downloadable attachment to this blog post includes importable GPOs, a PowerShell script for applying the GPOs to local policy, custom ADMX files for Group Policy settings, documentation in spreadsheet form and as a Policy Analyzer file (MSFT-Win10-v1809-RS5-WS2019-DRAFT.PolicyRules). In this release, we have changed the documentation layout in a few ways:

  • MS Security Baseline Windows 10 v1809 and Server 2019.xlsx – multi-tabbed workbook listing all Group Policy settings that ship in-box with Windows 10 v1809 or Windows Server 2019. Columns for “Windows 10 v1809,” “WS2019 Member Server,” and “WS2019 DC” show the recommended settings for those three scenarios. A small number of cells are color-coded to indicate that the settings should not be applied to systems that are not joined to an Active Directory domain. Cells in the “WS2019 DC” columns are also highlighted when they differ from the corresponding cells in the “WS2019 Member Server” column. Another change from past spreadsheets is that we have combined tabs that used to be separate. Specifically, we are no longer breaking out Internet Explorer and Windows Defender AV settings into separate tabs, nor the settings for LAPS, MS Security Guide, and MSS (Legacy). All these settings are now in the Computer and User tabs.
  • BaselineDiffs-to-v1809-RS5-DRAFT.xlsx – This Policy Analyzer-generated workbook lists the differences in Microsoft security configuration baselines between the new baselines and the corresponding previous baselines. The Windows 10 v1809 settings are compared against those for Windows 10 v1803, and the Windows Server 2019 baselines are compared against those for Windows Server 2016.
  • Windows 10 1803 to 1809 New Settings.xlsx – Lists all the settings that are available in Windows 10 v1809 that were added since Windows 10 v1803. (We used to highlight these settings in the big all-settings spreadsheets.)
  • Server 2016 to 2019 New Settings.xlsx – Lists all the settings that are available in Windows Server 2019 that were added since Windows Server 2016. (We used to highlight these settings in the big all-settings spreadsheets.)

Highlights of the differences from past baselines, which are listed in BaselineDiffs-to-v1809-RS5-DRAFT.xlsx:

  • The MS Security Guide custom setting protecting against potentially unwanted applications (PUA) has been deprecated, and is now implemented with a new setting under Computer Configuration\...\Windows Defender Antivirus.
  • We have enabled the “Encryption Oracle Remediation” setting we had considered for v1803. At the time we were concerned that enabling the newly-introduced setting would break too many not-yet-patched systems. We assume that systems have since been brought up to date. (You can read information about the setting hereand here.)
  • Changes to Virtualization-Based Security settings (used by Credential Guard and Code Integrity):
    • “Platform Security Level” changed from “Secure Boot and DMA Protection” to “Secure Boot.” If system hardware doesn’t support DMA protection, selecting “Secure Boot and DMA Protection” prevents Credential Guard from operating. If you can affirm that your systems support the DMA protection feature, choose the stronger option. We have opted for “Secure Boot” (only) in the baseline to reduce the likelihood that Credential Guard fails to run.
    • Enabled the new System Guard Secure Launch setting which will enable Secure Launch on new capable hardware. Secure Launch changes the way windows boots to use Intel Trusted Execution Technology (TXT) and Runtime BIOS Resilience features to prevent firmware exploits from being able to impact the security of the Windows Virtualization Based Security environment.
    • Enabled the “Require UEFI Memory Attributes Table” option.
  • Enabled the new Kernel DMA Protection feature described here. The “External device enumeration” policy controls whether to enumerate external devices that are not compatible with DMA-remapping. Devices that are compatible with DMA-remapping are always enumerated.
  • Removed the BitLocker setting, “Allow Secure Boot for integrity validation,” as it merely enforced a default that was unlikely to be modified even by a misguided administrator.
  • Removed the BitLocker setting, “Configure minimum PIN length for startup,” as new hardware features reduce the need for a startup PIN, and the setting increased Windows’ minimum by only one character.
  • Enabled the new Microsoft Edge setting to prevent users from bypassing certificate error messages, bringing Edge in line with a similar setting for Internet Explorer.
  • Removed the block against handling PKU2U authentication requests, as the feature is increasingly necessary.
  • Removed the configuration of the “Create symbolic links” user rights assignment, as it merely enforced a default, was unlikely to be modified by a misguided administrator or for malicious purposes, and needs to be changed to a different value when Hyper-V is enabled.
  • Removed the deny-logon restrictions against the Guests group as unnecessary: by default, the Guest account is the only member of the Guests group, and the Guest account is disabled. Only an administrator can enable the Guest account or add members to the Guests group.
  • Removed the disabling of the xbgm (“Xbox Game Monitoring”) service, as it is not present in Windows 10 v1809. (By the way, consumer services such as the Xbox services have been removed from Windows Server 2019 with Desktop Experience!)
  • Removed Credential Guard from the Domain Controller baseline. (Credential Guard is not useful on domain controllers and is not supported there.)
  • Created and enabled a new custom MS Security Guide setting for the domain controller baseline, “Extended Protection for LDAP Authentication (Domain Controllers only),” which configures the LdapEnforceChannelBinding registry value described here.
  • The Server 2019 baselines pick up all the changes accumulated in the four Windows 10 releases since Windows Server 2016.
See the rest of the changes here

NIST final public draft Special Publication 800-37, Revision 2


NIST announces the final public draft Special Publication 800-37, Revision 2Risk Management Framework for Information Systems and Organizations--A System Life Cycle Approach for Security and Privacy.

There are seven major objectives for this update:

  • To provide closer linkage and communication between the risk management processes and activities at the C-suite or governance level of the organization and the individuals, processes, and activities at the system and operational level of the organization;
  • To institutionalize critical risk management preparatory activities at all risk management levels to facilitate a more effective, efficient, and cost-effective execution of the RMF;
  • To demonstrate how the NIST Cybersecurity Framework can be aligned with the RMF and implemented using established NIST risk management processes;
  • To integrate privacy risk management processes into the RMF to better support the privacy protection needs for which privacy programs are responsible;
  • To promote the development of trustworthy secure software and systems by aligning life cycle-based systems engineering processes in NIST Special Publication 800-160, Volume 1, with the relevant tasks in the RMF;
  • To integrate security-related, supply chain risk management (SCRM) concepts into the RMF to address untrustworthy suppliers, insertion of counterfeits, tampering, unauthorized production, theft, insertion of malicious code, and poor manufacturing and development practices throughout the SDLC; and
  • To allow for an organization-generated control selection approach to complement the traditional baseline control selection approach and support the use of the consolidated control catalog in NIST Special Publication 800-53, Revision 5.

The addition of the Prepare step is one of the key changes to the RMF—incorporated to achieve more effective, efficient, and cost-effective security and privacy risk management processes.

In addition to seeking your comments on this final public draft, we are specifically seeking feedback on a new RMF Task P-13, Information Life Cycle. The life cycle describes the stages through which information passes, typically characterized as creation or collection, processing, dissemination, use, storage, and disposition, to include destruction and deletion. Identifying and understanding all stages of the information life cycle have significant implications for security and privacy. We are seeking comment on how organizations would executive this task and how we might provide the most helpful discussion to assist organizations in the execution.  

The public comment period for the draft publication is October 2 through October 31. Please submit comments using the comment template to sec-cert@nist.gov.